Is Risk Fun With 2 To 3 Players? 


Is Risk Fun With 2 To 3 Players? 

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Risk is a strategy board game of world domination that has been wildly popular since its release in the late 1950s. Several variations of the game have been released over the years. 

When Parker Brothers first acquired the game from French film director Albert Lamorisse in 1959 it was released as Risk: The Continental Game. Later it was released again as Risk: The Game of Global Domination.

I remember playing this version with my brothers when I was younger. We would spend hours at the kitchen table trying to eliminate each other. 

In 1986 a version called Castle Risk which was an 18th century map depicting European castles was released. 

Secret Mission Risk was released 1993. Then in 2002 media franchise versions of Risk began to make an appearance, such as Star Wars, Transformers, and Lord of the Rings. 

Risk is designed to be played by 2 to 6 players. Risk can be enjoyed with 2 to 3 players, however the more players that you have for a game will make it more challenging and thereby more fun. 

Growing up and playing this game with my brothers it was often just three of us playing and we enjoyed it. Since then, I have played it a few times with my children, also only three players.

If you wish to play Risk with just two players you will need to make an adjustment of how you play to enjoy the game. In order to play two player Risk, you will likely want to use something called dummy armies. You will want to set up dummy armies so that conquering continents is a little more difficult and it will make the game last longer. 

There are two ways that you can put the dummy armies on the board. If you decided to go with a random deal method to establish the armies then you will put all of the territory cards into one stack. 

Take the stack of territory cards and then deal them into three separate piles. One for you, one for your opponent, and one for the dummy army. 

All three armies will start with forty infantry on the board. Next you will claim the territories as you would normally. While you are placing your armies on the board each player will place two armies on the board for the dummy army on their turn.

You can also use a territory draft method to select two different dummy armies. With this method the players select their territories alternately. 

Each player will select territories for the two dummy armies. The two players will end up with fourteen territories and forty infantry each and each dummy army will have seven territories and twenty infantry. 

Now you can play Risk as usual. The dummy armies do not attack or gain reinforcements, they only defend their territories. When you are attacking a dummy army, have your opponent roll the dice for that army. 

The purpose of the dummy army is to be an obstacle in the way of the players. You can even set up a dummy army for three-person Risk.

To see the most popular Risk editions just click here. 

How Many Players Is Best For Risk? 

Risk can be played with anywhere from two to six players. While you can play a two-player game, Risk is going to be the most challenging in a six-person game. The game of Risk is over when only one player remains. 

If you are looking for a challenger then playing Risk with 6 players will be the best. If you just want to have some fun while the game doesn’t last forever then playing with 4 players will be best. 

A player is eliminated from the game when they no longer have any territories. When someone loses their last territory that player must then give the conquering player all of their territory cards. The game ends when one player has control over all of the territories, or if you are playing with dummy armies then the game ends when only one player has territories. 

Since Risk is a strategy game it can take hours of territories changing hands before the game will end. The more people you have playing with you, the longer the game will last and the more fun it will be.

How Long Does A Game Of Risk Take To Play? 

If you’re looking for a longer board game to play then you found it when you came across Risk. 

Risk is designed to take between one and three hours to play. How long the game plays truly depends on the people who are playing it and how well their strategy and luck turns out.

I have read where a group of friends had played the game for nine hours straight! That’s dedication to the game. 

I’ve also read about people who have spread the game out over a long weekend. To spread it out like that they were taking breaks during the game. 

If you have a place where you can have the game set up where it won’t be disturbed you could easily play the game for an hour, then take a break and come back a few hours later or even the next night to pick up where you left off. 

If you do decide to do this then I recommend that before you take your break, you jot down who will have the first turn when you come back to finish up your game.

What Takes Longer Risk Or Monopoly?

Monopoly and Risk are both strategic board games where the end goal is to dominate the board. In Monopoly each player purchases properties. Once a player has a complete color set of properties, they can then build houses and hotels on it to increase the rent that a player must pay when they land on the property. 

In Risk each player conquers territories and builds armies with the end goal of conquering the map. 

Technically, Risk is supposed to take longer than Monopoly to play. Monopoly is designed to last between a half hour and an hour to play while Risk has an estimated gameplay time of one to three hours.

However, it really does depend on who is playing, the strategy that the players have, and the luck of the players. I have played games of Monopoly that have lasted several hours, in fact, a month ago we played the game for two and a half hours before we ended it. 

At that point my kids no longer wanted to play so we decided to end it and cashed in all the properties for their mortgage values in order to declare the winner. 

I have also played a game of Risk which ended at around the thirty-minute mark.

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