Does The Game Of Sorry Have Dice? (Did It Ever?)


Does The Game Of Sorry Have Dice? (Did It Ever?)

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Growing up as a board game enthusiast, there hasn’t been hardly a single game I haven’t played so far. In a time where Ludo, Monopoly, and Scrabble were at the forefront of the gaming scene, I found myself particularly enticed by the Sorry game. 

Since it looks strikingly similar to Ludo in some ways, it’s common for people to ask, “does Sorry have dice?” or “did it ever?”

As of now, the traditional Sorry game is played using cards as opposed to dice. However, over the years there have been different versions of the game that use dice. 

For example, right now there is a game called Sorry Express that uses dice instead of cards for moving. 

Without further ado, let’s get into the facts and myths surrounding the Sorry game’s origins. To see the most popular Sorry sets just click here. 

Why Is The Game Called Sorry?

Marketed for two to four players, ages six and above, the first thing most people question about the game is the reasoning behind its name. 

Since the nature of the game is such that players are supposed to negate the progress of other players, this hindrance of progress is often followed by an apology, hence the name “Sorry!”

Everytime you land on someone’s pawn or send them back home with a “Sorry” card you will proclaim “Sorry!”. Although you might not be truly sorry it is a fun part of the game. 

Did People Use Dice To Play Sorry Originally?

It’s hard to figure out everything about the past of most board games, and the same is the case with the Sorry! Game. Personal accounts of people who have played the original game are so far the only way to determine whether dice were ever a part of it. 

However, here’s the tricky part about it.

Personal accounts are sometimes the least reliable source of information since there are always varying opinions. 

Many people who remember playing it in the 80s have claimed that the older version of the game used dice instead of cards, but others also claim that the game has always been card movement-based, and they don’t remember using dice at all. 

Hence, there’s no end to claims and opinions, but the real conclusion remains unknown. 

Does Sorry Game Have Dice Now?

While the original version that is still played today has cards, there is a newer version that goes by the name of “Sorry! Express” which uses dice. Here’s more on it.

How Do You Play The Dice Version Of Sorry?

We all know how the card version works, but if you are new to the dice-movement version, it isn’t all that different. 

Sorry! Express is the new travel themed version of the original Sorry! Game and here’s what it consists of:

➢ Three dice

➢ Four home bases

➢ A start base

➢ Sixteen pawns

Similar to the original Sorry game, this one too can facilitate four people playing at a time. As per the rule, you take a home base, set it using a different color, put all the pawns on the relevant start base regardless of the number of people playing. 

Here’s how the dice come in. The first player will roll the three dice together and get one of the four possibilities:

1. Color pawn: This is when you choose a color pawn in your start base, and if that pawn matches the color of your home base, then you can put it in your home section.

On the other hand, you have to put it in the waiting area if it doesn’t. If there aren’t any pawns of the same color in your start base but you end up rolling the same color, then you are eligible to take that pawn from the waiting area of another player. 

However, do not take anything from their home.

2. Sorry!: This is when you pick a pawn from a player’s home section in the home base and hold it with you.

3. Wild Pawn: You can take a pawn of any color from the waiting areas or the start base of any other player and hold it with you but make sure not to take anything from the home section.

4. Slide: You can either change the color of your own or another player’s home section.

All in all, the deal is to get the same-colored pawns in your home section first, and that’s how you win.

How Has Sorry Managed To Become An All-Time Favorite?

It’s not uncommon to come across at least one Sorry! Game set in any millennial’s cupboard. After all, there’s a reason it’s considered one of the classic board games ever. 

It’s also commendable how the game has only undergone a few minor changes in appearance ever since its advent in 1934, keeping it as original as ever.

Several board games have undergone drastic changes, but when it comes to the Sorry! Game, all you may have seen is a slight change in the image of the diamond. 

Even though some new versions of the game like Sorry! Express (travel-based) and Sorry! Not Sorry! (for adults) have emerged, the original Sorry! Game is still readily available in the market.

Despite minor changes and a few updates, the original Sorry! Game is still very much a crowd pleaser and will continue to be so. If you ask me, it often takes me back to the simpler times where all I looked forward to at the end of the day was a refreshing session of Sorry to recharge and rejuvenate.

Final Thoughts

So, does the Sorry game have dice? Not originally. Is the dice version any better than the card version? It’s all about preferences; but for those who’ve grown up playing the original card version, adapting to the dice version may not be enticing.

No matter how many versions the creators of the game come up with, nothing will ever beat the superiority of the original Sorry game, at least for me. 

While the dice-movement version is a commendable update, most Sorry players will agree that the card-movement original version will always be the real deal.

Even though the newer versions of the game like Sorry Express (travel-based) and Sorry! Not Sorry! (for adults) have recently gained momentum as the crowd favorites among the newer generation, many people still prefer to play the original version no matter how complicated it may seem to an outsider.

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