Do Legos Hold Their Value? (Do They Go Up In Value?)


Do Legos Hold Their Value?

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Legos have been a household name for years in many countries around the world because anyone from ages 5-99 can enjoy them. Lego releases different collectible sets that many people enjoy building. The collectible sets boast a wide range of interests for the varied Lego fans from castles to sitcoms.

Collectible Lego sets and limited edition mini figures hold their value and may even increase in value over the years. Lego sets can be sold used or new and will still have a decent return on investment if the set is popular enough. 

Since Lego releases a limited number for most sets and discontinues sets often, the collectible boxes tend to increase in value over the years for people who did not know or care about Legos at the time of release and want them now. 

Some fans simply could not attain a set during release for various reasons such as cost or stocking issues. The fans who missed out along with the new fans are willing to pay more for discontinued Lego sets.

Legos are coveted because the attention to detail excites those who decide to build the sets, and the process of building the sets brings friends and family together for hours of fun that generate conversations and create lasting memories. 

The different sets have a lot of little creative designs that are exciting and surprising for the builders.

New sets obviously sell for the most (excluding the rare popular sets from years ago), but used sets can retain their value too. What makes used sets more valuable over time is making sure the original box and instructions are still intact as well as having all of the original pieces. 

Many would-be buyers prefer Legos that come from a smoke-free home and that the bricks are clean of any grime or adhesives.

To see the most popular Lego sets currently on the market just click here. 

Do Legos Go Up In Value?

Legos may increase in value but the collectible sets and mini figures are only as valuable as potential future buyers make them. The sets may sell really well during release, but if the theme of the set loses public interest over the years less people will be interested in buying those sets. 

On the other hand, Lego sets have been known to increase in value over 300% when sold never opened. Collectible sets are collectible for a reason. 

Lego makes what people enjoy and markets their new sets very well.

Legos sets really only go up in value if they are themed sets but an increase in value is not guaranteed. The more popular a set is, the more likely an increase in value is over time. 

Starter boxes and creative build sets are extremely common and easy to acquire so they are not as likely to go up in value.  Legos are probably more popular and recognizable not because of their collectible sets, but because of their affordable play sets. 

Children and adults alike like playing with Legos to express their imagination and build whatever they can with the blocks they have.

When I was younger, I loved creating buildings such as garages, houses, and towers while hiding the people and vehicles inside. I loved having my own little surprise inside the structures I built because they made me feel like I had a secret no one else was privy to. 

I remember building a helicopter from a boxed set with my dad. I did not enjoy having to follow directions and look for particular pieces. I would have preferred to build my own helicopter, however basic it may have been. 

My friends however loved collecting and building the themed sets because they absolutely loved finding the little details hidden throughout the build and having a structure that aligned with their interests. 

That’s part of the reason Legos have maintained their status over the years. 

People can play with them in multiple ways and still enjoy what they have. Nostalgia and fun can drive up value on many products, and Legos seem to be no exception.

Is Buying Lego Sets A Good Investment?

Legos are designed and created to be built and many people love them because they are fun. Legos will sometimes have a decent return on investment especially the longer they are held after discontinuation. 

The investment part is tricky because Legos have to be stored in a safe place away from the elements, potential pests, and away from those curious, energetic children who just love playing with things they find in out of the way places.

Although Legos can be a good investment sometimes it is far from a guaranteed thing. If you are looking for a place to invest your money putting it into Lego sets probably isn’t the best option for you. 

Legos will have the greatest return if the box is never opened and in good condition so the storage and product care are essential considerations. 

If the Lego sets do happen to be opened or damaged for any reason, your investment return significantly decreases. If you have the space and storage, Legos can bring in some money, but you should definitely diversify your assets. Try not to build your future retirement on hoarded Lego sets that you spent hours to buy and years to maintain only to be destroyed by one invasive squirrel, a quiet child who wandered into the attic, or a house fire. 

Insurance will only cover the current value of the product, not the amount that it could have been worth in the future. 

What Legos Are Worth Money?

Lego sets change in value as public interests and accessibility change. The Legos that people tend to enjoy the most and that sell for the most money vary after being discontinued. 

Generally, franchise themed sets and figures that have stood the test of time will always be popular because parents tend to imprint their interests on their children especially if the interests are second and third generation. Those children will grow up hearing about the same characters and stories that dad and grandpa loved and have a love for those characters. 

Lego not only preserves those characters and franchises, but gives people a chance to build and be part of the world they love.

The most valuable Lego sets as of now are the Millennium Falcon, Taj Mahal, Lego King’s Castle, Imperial Star Destroyer. Lego Airport Shuttle, Lego Market Street, Lego Milk Truck, Lego Mr. Gold, Lego ers Line Container Ship, Lego Grand Carousel, and the Lego Statue of Liberty according to Fatherly.com.

Other Lego sets that have increased in value are ones that became immensely popular due to current public interests that turned into nostalgia later on. Well-known buildings, monuments, and structures that are internationally recognized hold their value well. 

Pop culture and limited edition mini figures hold a special place in the hearts of Lego fans so they are often worth a good amount of money too. The longer you wait, the more the most popular Legos increase in value unless the franchise or character has a huge decline in public interest.

Are Legos A Waste Of Money?

If you plan on just displaying the boxes or buying Legos just because everyone else does, then, yes, Legos might be considered to be a waste of money. 

However, Legos are expensive and popular for a reason. 

They are extremely durable as many parents with bruised feet will tell you. Legos last way longer than their competition and have name recognition that keeps them popular. 

The collectible sets may not be for you if you enjoy building your own ideas, but the assorted bricks and pieces are a good buy for children who love using their hands. 

Legos are only a waste of money if you have no intention of playing with them or saving them for a potential future investment. However, if you or your children will enjoy playing with them for many years to come then I would not consider that to be a waste of money! 

 As with anything, whether it is considered a waste of money or not will vary from person to person. For example, some people think that buying any toy is a waste of money while others enjoy spending money to buy toys to enjoy with those that they love. 

There is nothing wrong with either viewpoint, just differences of opinion. 

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